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Auckland, New Zealand - Many analysts agree that there will be some changes to air travel in the post-pandemic era. The air travel is not expected to return to pre-pandemic levels for very long since people won't feel themselves safe against the virus spread in an airplane or out of their countries.

There are around from 75,000 to 90,000 daily flights at the moment, compared to 175,000 - 200,000 daily flights before the pandemic, and most of these flights are cargo flights.

Many have been parked in dedicated storage facilities at the airports or deserts. Air Canada has recently ferried five retired planes at a time to an aircraft graveyard in the Arizona desert. Even major hubs around the world had already been turned into a "glorified parking lot".

The Covid-19 crisis had accelerated the retirement of many aircraft. There is a lot of uncertainty about the future of the airline industry.


What routes will come back, what routes won't. Will the new aircraft projects be shelved such as the Boeing's NMA (New Mid-Market Airplane)? Obviously the development of an aircraft takes a decade or so, in the absence of customers, how manufacturers will fund their development projects? There are lots of questions that needed to be answered.


"I think there are going to be major changes that we certainly haven't foreseen at this point and are beginning to grapple with, but I think the big question as far as travel and tourism are concerned, are that people won't travel until they feel safe to do so,"

 Ian Petchenik of Flightradar24 told New Zealand's Sunday Morning newspaper.

"Getting on an aircraft, walking through the airport, going to a hotel, when people feel safe doing that, however that ends up happening, I think that's when airlines start to see things really pick up,"

he added.

Aviation data firm OAG is predicting the normal volume of fliers might not recover until 2022 or 2023.

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